Teacher ratings as a language screening for dialect speakers

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In the last review, we shared research on a potentially valid tool to screen Mainstream English-speaking kindergarteners for language disorders. But what about our kiddos who speak other dialects of English, like African American English (AAE) or Southern White English (SWE)? In this study, researchers gave a group of AAE- and SWE-speaking kindergarteners a handful of language and literacy screeners, to see which one(s) could best identify possible language disorders, while avoiding “dialect effects.”

Their most successful screener (and TISLP’s winner for best acronym of the month) was the TROLL, or Teacher Rating of Oral Language and Literacy—available here for free. And yes, that’s a teacher questionnaire, rather than another individually-administered assessment for our students who spend so much time testing already. Importantly, the teachers completed the ratings and the end of the kindergarten year, not the beginning, so they had time to really get to know the students and their abilities.

The researchers calculated a new cut score of 89 for this population, since the TROLL itself only suggests cut scores through age 5. This resulted in sensitivity of 77% for identification of language disorders. Now, 77% isn’t really high enough—we want a minimum of 80 for a good screener. But it may be a starting place until better tools come our way.

Gregory, K. D., & Oetting, J. B. (2018). Classification Accuracy of Teacher Ratings When Screening Nonmainstream English-Speaking Kindergartners for Language Impairment in the Rural South. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 49(2), 218–231. https://doi.org/10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0045.