And more

  • Bavin et al. found that in children with cochlear implants, pre-implant early receptive communication skills and early gesture use were the strongest predictors of vocabulary one year post-implant. Targeting receptive language and use of gestures may be the way to go if you are working with toddlers with hearing loss, prior to receiving a cochlear implant.
  • Cunningham et al remind clinicians and researchers alike to consider growth in outcomes related to engagement and participation rather than just impairment, and discuss predictors of communication participation outcomes. This is actually a very large study, with some strong data to show that speech­–language services, in general, work to improve the outcomes in early intervention. They also have intensity data here. So if you need a study to show that what we do really matters, this is a good one to add to your stack!
  • Although the research base that focuses on decoding, fluency, and reading comprehension in older children with autism continues to expand, relatively less is known about the emergent literacy skills of young children with ASD. Fluery and Lease (2018) examined code- and meaning-focused emergent literacy skills of 3 to 5-year-olds with ASD as well as their parents’ beliefs about their early reading development. Findings from this study have important clinical applications: First, variability in the children’s emergent literacy skills suggests that reading interventions for young children with ASD should be tailored to meet the individual needs of each child. Second, results suggested that parents of children with stronger communication skills had a more positive outlook on their child’s ability to benefit from reading exposure and instruction. This finding suggests that we need to provide extra support and education to parents whose children with ASD have more complex communication needs.
  • Eye gaze and, specifically, gaze following serves as an important social and language-learning tool for infants. What is still unclear is specifically what motivates an infant to follow a caregiver’s gaze. Findings from Gredeback, Astor, and Fawcett’s (2018) recent study suggest that social, attention-grabbing events (e.g., something as simple as a head turn) may be just as a strong of a motivator for infants to follow a caregiver’s gaze as previously recognized perceived communicative intent.
  • Ibanez et al examined the efficacy of a web-based program for training parents of children with ASD to use behavioral strategies in day-to-day routines such as bath time and snack. Parents in the tutorial group reported that they used more strategies, felt they parented more efficiently and experienced less stress, and reported that their children engaged and communicated more during daily routines. The article directs readers to an example of the tutorial and menu of current tutorials
  • Neuman et al. analyzed over 2000 scenes from language-focused educational media. Videos with attention-directing cues (basically zooming in on the target) were most successful in helping children learn new vocabulary. However, children with higher language scores were more likely to use these cues to learn vocabulary, so educational videos may not be as helpful for those with language delays.
  • Pearson, Oliver, and Waite surveyed parents of children with rare genetic syndromes to see what types of information these families felt they needed most to help their children. They found that concerns associated with Angelman syndrome included sleep, communication, and health, while parents of children with Cri du Chat syndrome were most concerned with health, behavior, and daily living skills, and parents of children with Cornelia de Lange syndrome often wanted information on behavior, health, and self-injury. The authors highlight the need for clinicians to be aware of and address parents’ perceptions and concerns about their children’s disorders.
  • Spinelli & Mesman found that both the prosody of infant-directed speech and caregiver sensitivity to infants’ social–emotional cues contribute together to infant social–emotional development. We can’t do “motherese” alone, we have to be able to read and respond to baby’s cues and interactive attempts. (Also, see here for more information on the effect of motherese on infant development).
  • We know that exposing young children to decontextualized language, or, abstract talk that’s removed from the here-and-now, can improve their later vocabulary, narrative skills, and reading comprehension. Uccelli et al.’s recent study provides a unique perspective by demonstrating a link between toddlers’ use of decontextualized talk and higher levels of academic language proficiency 10 years later.

 

Bavin, E.L., Sarant, J., Leigh, G., Prendergast, L., Busby, P., & Peterson, C. (2018). Children with cochlear implants in infancy: predictors of early vocabulary. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12383

Cunningham, B. J., Hanna, S. E., Rosenbaum, P., Thomas-Stonell, N., & Oddson, B. (2018). Factors contributing to preschoolers’ communicative participation outcomes: Findings from a population-based longitudinal cohort study in Ontario, Canada. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 27(2), 737-750. doi: 10.1044/2017_AJSLP-17-0079.

Fleury, V. P., & Lease, E. M. (2018). Early indication of reading difficulty? A descriptive analysis of emergent literacy skills in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 0, 1 – 12.

Gredeback, G., Astor, K., & Fawcett, C. (2018). Gaze following is not dependent on ostensive cues: A critical test of natural pedagogy. Child Development. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1111/cdev.13026.

Ibanez, L. V., Kobak, K., Swanson, A., Wallace, L., Warren, Z., & Stone, W. L. (2018). Enhancing interactions during daily routines: A randomized controlled trial of a web-based tutorial for parents of young children with ASD. Autism Research, 11(2), 667–678. https://doi.org/10.1002/aur.1919

Neuman, S. B., Wong, K.M., Flynn, R., & Kaefer, T. (2018). Learning vocabulary from educational media: The role of pedagogical supports for low-income preschoolers. Journal of Educational Psychology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1037/edu0000278

Spinelli, M. &b Mesman, J. (2018). The regulation of infant negative emotions: The role of maternal sensitivity and infant-directed speech prosody. Infancy, 23(4), 502–518.

Uccelli, P., Demir-Lira, O. E., Rowe, M. L., Levine, M., & Goldin-Meadow, S. (2018). Children’s early decontextualized talk predicts academic language proficiency in midadolescence. Child Development. Advance online publication. doi: doi.org/10.1111/cdev.13034