Throwback (2013): Grammar intervention for… social & literacy skills?

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Children with language disorders often struggle with social skills and literacy. While their IEPs might reflect grammatical deficits, we must consider how language issues might impact other areas of student’s lives. Is there a way to sneakily incorporate social and literacy skills into our grammatical interventions in an evidence-based way? The short answer is... yes!

Washington (2013) hypothesized that expressive grammar intervention could naturally support preschoolers to improve their social interaction and print concepts. In this intervention, preschoolers were asked to engage in a sentence-building task aimed at forming subject-verb-object sentences given various prompts. However, in addition to typical language-related prompting, SLPs integrated social and print concept features throughout therapy. Some of the techniques included:  

  • Guidance for listening and turn taking

  • Modeling appropriate toy play

  • Facilitating interactions with peers

  • Use of visuals to highlight morphemes

  • Pointing to words and letters while turning pages of a book

  • Highlighting book conventions such as directionality and orientation

These are things that many of us probably do without thinking during various types of therapy. However, this study provided evidence that purposefully adding elements of social and literacy skills can lead to significant, broad-based enrichment of social skills and emergent literacy. Children even maintained these social and literacy improvements for three months post-intervention. Your students with language disorders can get a three-for-one deal, just by attending your therapy sessions!

 

Washington, K. N. (2013). The association between expressive grammar intervention and social emergency literacy outcomes for preschoolers with SLI. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 22, 113–125.