Throwback (2013): Connecting through commenting

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Conversation can be one of the most difficult tasks for students with co-morbid language and social communication impairments.

One of the most important parts of a conversation is validating social comments—statements or questions directed towards peers for the sole purpose of furthering the interaction. They might include expressing feelings, sharing information, asking a peer a question, or helping a peer with a task. Though they come naturally to typically-developing peers, kids with social communication deficits need explicit instruction and multiple opportunities to practice.

In 2013, Fujiki et al. implemented a 10-week intervention meant to increase students’ use of validating social comments. Students ages 6–9 participated in 15–30-minute sessions, 2–4 times per week with the following procedure: 

  1. Individual direct-instruction and practice sessions using social stories and role-playing

  2. Video-taped practice with typically-developing peers during a social game

  3. Video-review sessions with the SLP to provide feedback and highlight positive interactions

This intervention led to an increase in validating social comments in three out of the four children, and an increase in teacher’s perception of the student’s likeability and prosocial behavior. (In the fourth case, the student’s aggressive behaviors undermined his ability to participate effectively.) Although peer perceptions of students did not change, the authors note that a more intense and sustained intervention (i.e. longer than ten weeks) might be effective to foster peer friendships for these students.

For those school-based SLPs out there, this type of intervention might be perfect for your push-in sessions—that’s a win for both kids and therapists!

 

Fujiki, M., Brinton, B., McCleave, C. P., Anderson, V.W., & Chamberlain, J.P. (2013). A social communication intervention to increase validating comments by children with language impairment. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. doi: 10.1044/0161-1461(2012/11-103).