And more

Boyce et al. found that school-aged children with cleft lip and/or palate had receptive and expressive language skills within the normal range, similar to their typically developing peers. Note that children with clefts in this study did not have a co-occurring syndromic diagnosis or other major medical condition. The findings remind us to evaluate all students individually, and without making assumptions based on diagnoses.

Caron et al. found interventions using AAC software with Transition to Literacy (T2L) features increased sight word recognition accuracy for kids with autism. T2L, currently available on a few speech generating devices/apps, is designed to make orthographic and phonological cues more salient for people who use AAC. Check out the full article for pictures that show how the app draws attention to the words—and be on the lookout for these features to make their way into more dynamic AAC systems.  

Guiberson & Crowe, recognizing that we have a limited evidence base for intervention with multilingual children with hearing loss, reviewed interventions designed for multilingual children only, children with hearing loss only, and multilingual children with hearing loss— specifically audition, speech, language, and literacy interventions. You’ll need to use your clinical judgment to apply the findings, but it’s a starting point if you find yourself supporting students with similar needs. 

Morin et al. evaluated the quality of research on the use of high-tech AAC to teach social-communication skills. They found that using high-tech AAC to teach social-communication skills to individuals with ASD or ID can be considered an evidence-based practice. Their review also indicated that high-tech AAC was not significantly better than low-tech AAC when teaching social-communication skills to this population.a

Ring et al. studied the efficacy of the Take Flight reading intervention, an Orton-Gillingham based approach with and added focus on phonological awareness, reading rate, and comprehension. Their results support previous findings on the effectiveness of the individual treatment components (synthetic phonics, etc.), including the benefit of adding comprehension work.

Sutherland et al. completed a systematic review of telehealth assessment and intervention for children and adults with ASD. They found that services delivered via telehealth were equivalent to those delivered face-to-face, however, the recipients of the majority of the interventions were parents, carers, and/or teachers. Those that did include individuals with ASD interacting with the interventionist were predominantly adults and older children with ASD. The authors emphasized that future research must look at telehealth services when providing direct services to people with ASD, especially young children.

We know it helps to leverage L1 when we teach English vocab (see our review of Méndez et al.), but how do you actually DO that if you're not bilingual yourself? One possible avenue might be computer-based bilingual vocabulary lessons tied to e-books. Wood et al. found that Kindergarten–1st grade English Learners who read e-books with embedded vocab instruction in Spanish and English made greater gains in vocabulary than those who only read the books.

Wood et al. found that electropalatography (EPG) could be an effective way to help people with Down Syndrome (DS) improve their articulation, and that the visual feedback EPG provides capitalizes on a strength of many people with DS. The authors emphasize that their findings, combined with others’, shows that individuals with DS can keep improving their speech and intelligibility into their teen years and beyond.

 

Boyce, J. O., Kilpatrick, N., Reilly, S., Da Costa, A., & Morgan, A. T. (2018). Receptive and Expressive Language Characteristics of School-Aged Children with Non-Syndromic Cleft Lip and/or Palate. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 53(5), 959–968.

Caron, J., Light, J., Holyfield, C., & McNaughton, D. (2018). Effects of Dynamic Text in an AAC App on Sight Word Reading for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 34(2), 143–154.

Guiberson, M., & Crowe, K. (2018). Interventions for Multilingual Children with Hearing Loss. Topics in Language Disorders, 38(3), 225–241.

Morin, K. L., Ganz, J. B., Gregori, E. V., Foster, M. J., Gerow, S. L., Genç-Tosun, D., & Hong, E. R. (2018). A systematic quality review of high-tech AAC interventions as an evidence-based practice. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 34, 104–117.

Ring, J.J., Avrit, K.J. & Black, J.L. (2017). Take Flight: The evolution of an Orton Gilingham-based curriculum. Annals of Dyslexia, 67, 383–400.

Sutherland, R., Trembath, D., & Roberts, J. (2018). Telehealth and autism: A systematic search and review of the literature. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 20, 324–336.

Wood, C., Fitton, L., Petscher, Y., Rodriguez, E., Sunderman, G., & Lim, T. (2018). The effect of e-Book vocabulary instruction on Spanish–English speaking children. Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research, 61, 1945–1969. 

Wood, S. E., Timmins, C., Wishart, J., Hardcastle, W. J., & Cleland, J. (2018). Use of electropalatography in the treatment of speech disorders in children with Down syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders / Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12407

Perspective Pieces

Recall that TISLP doesn’t review Perspective Pieces. However, we do love them (sometimes our FAVORITE publications each month are Perspective Pieces), and think you should be reading these gems, too. There were a TON published this month. Browse the titles for topics you’re interested in, and enjoy!

·      Understanding Word Reading Difficulties in Children With SLI

·      Practitioner Reflection That Enhances Interprofessional Collaborative Practices for Serving Children Who Are Deaf/ Hard-of-Hearing

·      Using Multilinguistic Strategies to Improve Decoding in Older School-Age Students in a Contextualized and Motivational Approach

·      A Review of Psychosocial Risks and Management for Children with Cleft Lip and/or Palate

·      The Role of Semantic Knowledge in Learning to Read Exception Words

·      Technology Training in Speech-Language Pathology: A Focus on Tablets and Apps

·      Reading Longer Words: Insights Into Multisyllabic Word Reading

·      Small Group Reading Instruction: Activities for Teaching Phonemic Awareness, the Alphabetic Principle, and Phonics in a Tier 2 Setting

·      Speech Assessment in Children With Childhood Apraxia of Speech

·      Does Access to Visual Input Inhibit Auditory Development for Children With Cochlear Implants? A Review ofthe Evidence

·      Efficacious Treatment of Children With Childhood Apraxia of Speech According to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health

·      Beyond Eyes and Ears: The Need for Movement Analysis of Speech and Nonspeech Behaviors in ChildrenWith Cerebral Palsy

·      Leading the Way With Supervision Training: Embracing Change and Transforming Clinical Practice

·      Perceptions of Mentoring SLPs and Clinical Fellows During the Clinical Fellowship

·      How Stuttering Develops: The Multifactorial Dynamic Pathways Theory

·      Examination of Coaching Behaviors Used by Providers When Delivering Early Intervention via Telehealth to Families of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

·      We’ve Got Some Growing Up to Do: An Evidence-Based Service Delivery Model for the Transition of Care for the Young Adult with Cleft Lip and Palate

·      Are We Slipping Them Through the Cracks? The Insufficiency of Norm-Referenced Assessments for Identifying Language Weaknesses in Children With Hearing Loss

And more...

  • Barton-Hulsey et al. present three case studies of dynamic assessment for an AAC device. Their results, per client, can’t be generalized to a broader population. However, the article presents clear and explicit methods for AAC evaluation and data collection, which may be worth clinical consideration.
  • Iarocci et al., in study of 174 children with and without autism, found that, “… exposure to a second language is not associated with an adverse impact on the communication and cognitive skills of children with ASD.” The authors acknowledge some of the common concerns of bilingualism in low-language children, and review research on the benefits of bilingualism in these children.
  • Morgan et al. show that cleft palate is a risk factor for language development, and that internationally-adopted children with cleft palate are at an even greater risk of low language skills (presumably because of the interruption in language as they switch from L1 to a new primary L2). We’ve talked about the impact of foreign adoption on language before.
  • Tenenbaum et al. examined visual conditions to support word learning in typically-developing children and those with autism spectrum disorder. They found that for children with autism (ages pre-K through early-elementary, with Preschool Language Scales (PLS) scores of at least 12 months, and producing at least single words), the children learned new object words better when the targeted object was held close to the speaker’s face while producing the word (but without covering the mouth), and that this supported word learning better than attention to the mouth alone or attention to the object alone.
  • Thurman et al. examine differences between the language skills of male children with fragile X and autism, and found that boys with fragile X have a relative strength in lexical skills compared to boys with autism.

 
Barton-Hulsey, A., Wegner, J., Brady, N.C., Bunce, B.H., & Sevcik, R.A. (2017) Comparing the effects of speech-generating device display organization on symbol comprehension and use by three children with developmental delays. American Journal of Speech­–Language Pathology. Advance online publication. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-15-0166.
 
Iarocci, G., Hutchison, S.M. & O’Toole, G.J. (2017). Second language exposure, functional communication, and executive function in children with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s10803-017-3103-7
 
Morgan, A.R., Bellucci, C.C., Coppersmith, J., Linde, S.B., Curtis, A., Albert, M., O'Gara, M.M., & Kapp-Simon, K. (2017). Language development in children with cleft palate with or without cleft lip adopted from non–English-speaking countries. American Journal of Speech–Language Pathology. Advance online publication. doi:10.1044/2016_AJSLP-16-0030.

Tenenbaum, E.J., Amso, D., Righi, G., & Sheinkopf, S.S. (2017). Attempting to “Increase intake from the input”: attention and word learning in children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Advance online publication. doi:10.1007/s10803-017-3098-0.

Thurman, A.J., McDuffie, A., Hagerman, R.J., Josol, C.K., & Abbeduto, L. (2017). Language skills of males with fragile X syndrome or nonsyndromic autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 47(3), 728–743.