How do we test narrative listening comprehension and inferencing?

We’ve talked before about the importance of listening comprehension skills for children’s reading outcomes. But listening comprehension can be tricky to assess. How do we know whether our client is struggling more than the average preschooler? The authors of this study have it covered, with a quick, cheap narrative listening comprehension and inferencing test— AND performance data from children ages 4–6. They used the Squirrel Story Narrative Comprehension Assessment (NCA; available here, paired with the book or app), which requires children to listen to an illustrated short story and answer literal and inferential comprehension questions at the end.  

Literal Comprehension

understanding details from the story

Screen Shot 2019-08-13 at 9.13.53 PM.png

Inferential Comprehension

making connections beyond the story

Screen Shot 2019-08-13 at 9.13.42 PM.png

Based on this study, the NCA looks like a useful measure of narrative listening comprehension. The researchers found that scores increase over the preschool years, are lower in kids with DLD, and are sensitive to changes after intervention (as found in this previous study). You can give the NCA, compare to other children age 4–6 using the data from Table I in the paper, and see whether your clients’ literal and inferential comprehension skills might warrant treatment (or whether your treatment is working).

Note that this is guideline data— with a small sample size, these aren’t definitive norms, but do provide us with a good start. See more research on development of inference skills here, and how to work on inferencing here and here.

 

Dawes, E., Leitão, S., Claessen, M., & Lingoh, C. (2019). Oral literal and inferential narrative comprehension in young typically developing children and children with developmental language disorder. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. doi: 10.1080/17549507.2019.1604803.