Helping older students with DLD gain language skills

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Most research on language treatment looks at younger children, but we know that kids with developmental language disorder (DLD) are likely to struggle with oral language skills in middle school and beyond. This study looked at the effectiveness of narrative and vocabulary treatment for older students with DLD. 

Researchers assigned 12-year-olds (year 7 students in the UK) to one of four groups: narrative treatment, vocabulary treatment, both narrative and vocabulary treatment, or a wait-listed control group. Teaching assistants (similar to paraprofessionals in the US) led treatment sessions with small groups of 2–6 students. Sessions lasted 45–60 minutes and took place 3 times a week for 6 weeks. The assistants used lessons from commercially available narrative and vocabulary treatment programs. Narrative lessons focused on story structure, comprehension, and generation; vocabulary lessons focused on educationally-relevant words taught through categorization, mind-mapping, and word association tasks.

After the six weeks, students in all 3 treatment groups improved on standardized tests of narrative skill, and students in the narrative and combined groups improved on some of the study narrative measures. There was no difference among the groups on standardized vocabulary tests, but on researcher-developed assessments similar to the treatment activities, vocabulary skills improved with intervention too.

These findings suggest that a short period of group treatment delivered by teaching assistants has the potential to improve language skills in older children with DLD. This is a big deal because we don’t have a lot of well-designed studies showing that language therapy actually works for older kids. Even better? The intervention model used here (treatment delivered to groups by paraprofessionals) should be feasible for most school settings.

 

Joffe, V. L., Rixon, L., & Hulme, C. (2019). Improving storytelling and vocabulary in secondary school students with language disorder: A randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders. doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12471