Grammar instruction for students with complex needs

When you think about therapy with students with complex needs, you might be thinking about prepping materials… lots of materials. But it doesn’t need to be that way! If you’re in the business of targeting grammatical structures with these types of students, read on to learn more about an intervention that includes simple visual supports that will keep your instruction explicit and consistent.

This pilot study used Shape Coding to target copula and auxiliary “be,” including plural and past tense marking. Shape Coding instruction uses shapes, colors, and arrows to make grammatical structures more salient. Want to see what we mean? You can get an overview of Shape Coding system here or check out our review of an oldie-but-goodie throwback article on Shape Coding here. The participants were 11 young teen students with Down syndrome or developmental delays. Some had secondary diagnoses such as hearing impairment or ADHD or spoke English as an additional language.

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After just eight 20-minute group sessions led by their school-based SLPs, most of the students (8/11) made gains that could be attributed to the treatment. For a diverse group of complex students, and a pretty short course of realistic-looking intervention? That is big news!

We highly recommend reading this full article. For one, you’ll get familiar with the ins and outs of Shape Coding. A full list of the intervention steps and materials needed is included as an Appendix. Also? It’ll fire up your inner advocate when the authors discuss the importance of including people with complex needs in research. They remind us that heterogeneity among this population “does not negate the need for more research in this area”—and we couldn’t agree more!

Tobin, L. M., & Ebbels, S. H. (2018). Effectiveness of intervention with visual templates targeting tense and plural agreement in copula and auxiliary structures in school-aged children with complex needs: A pilot study. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080.02699206.2018.1501608.

TIP: If you don’t have access to the original article, above, try here.