Differences in how teachers and SLPs see DLD

Teachers and SLPs* are supposed to collaborate to support children with developmental language disorder (DLD). Right?! Yet, it seems to infrequently happen successfully. This paper helps us identify why by capturing similarities and differences in how our fields view and support DLD.

Some highlights:

  1. SLPs conceptualize DLD as a language learning impairment; teachers more commonly label it as a learning disability.

  2. SLPs assess DLD in order to identify what areas of language are a weakness, with plans to directly target those language areas, and quantify outcomes based on language performance. However, teachers assess in order to guide classroom instruction, with plans to change the classroom environment, and measure educational achievement.

  3. SLPs tend to prescribe intervention that is added on to classroom instruction, whereas teachers are looking at how they can tailor instruction within the classroom curriculum.

  4. SLPs tend to value language as a critical skill in and of itself, whereas teachers don’t tend to conceptualize language in isolation. Instead, their focus is overall educational achievement (and of course they recognize that language skills are embedded within that, but they don’t usually think of language as a target).

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Overall, this paper is a really good exercise in perspective-taking for SLPs. It highlights fundamental differences in how speech–language professionals and teachers are taught, what their research literature focuses on, and how their practice mindsets can be very different. And understanding all this could be really useful in framing discussions on inter-professional collaboration.

 

*SLTs in the UK; this is an Irish paper

Gallagher, A.L., Murphy, C-.A.,  Conway, P., Perry, A. (2019). Consequential differences in perspectives and practices concerning children with developmental language disorders: an integrative review. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders. doi: 10.1111/1460-6984.12469.