Diagnosing DLD when you don’t speak a child’s first language

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We know that it’s best to assess children in their first languages. But, we simply don’t have access to measures or interpreters for all of the world’s languages. What’s a monolingual SLP to do?

New research supports what we’ve discussed previously: that by using parent questionnaires and measures of language processing, we can accurately diagnose language disorders in English language learners using only English measures. Li’el et al. recruited a sample of bilingual and monolingual Australian English-speaking 5- to 6-year-old children with and without developmental language disorder (DLD). “Bilingual” was defined as hearing English less than half the time at home. Parents completed a questionnaire and children completed the CTOPP nonword repetition and CELF-P2 recalling sentences subtests.

The researchers found that the parent questionnaire alone had the highest sensitivity and specificity (accuracy at ruling in and ruling out DLD). However, all of the assessments in combination still had good diagnostic accuracy, and it’s not a good idea to diagnose a child with only one test, so the authors recommend using more than one measure.

Overall, this study adds to evidence that by interviewing parents and using language processing tasks, we can do a pretty good job teasing apart a lack of English exposure from an underlying language disorder even if we can’t assess in a child’s first language.

 

Li’el, N., Williams, C. & Kane, R. (2018). Identifying developmental language disorder in bilingual children from diverse linguistic backgrounds. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/17549507.2018.1513073