A one–two punch for assessing young Spanish–English learners

Do you serve pre-K or kindergarten-aged kids? Are some/lots/all of them from Hispanic backgrounds and learning Spanish AND English? Mandatory reading right here, friends!

So—a major issue for young, dual-language learners? Appropriate language assessments. We talk about it a lot (plus here, here, here, and here, to name a few). In this new study, the authors compared a handful of assessments to see which could most accurately classify 4- and 5-year-olds (all Mexican–American and dual-language learners) as having typical vs. disordered language.

2.png

The single measure with the best diagnostic accuracy was two subtests of the Bilingual English-Spanish Assessment (BESA)—Morphosyntax and Semantics (the third subtest is phonology, which they didn’t use here). But to get even more accurate? Like, sensitivity of 100% and specificity of about 93%? Add in a story retell task (they used Frog, Where Are You?). Sample both Spanish and English, and take the better MLUw of the two. This BESA + MLU assessment battery outperformed other options in the mix (English and Spanish CELF-P2, plus a composite of the two, a parent interview, and a dynamic vocab assessment).

Not familiar with the BESA? It’s a newer test, designed—as the name implies—specifically for children who are bilingual, with different versions (not translated) of subtests in each language. If you give a subtest in both languages, you use the one with the highest score. And before you ask—yes, the test authors believe that monolingual SLPs can administer the BESA, given preparation and a trained assistant.

Now, the researchers here don’t include specific cut scores to work with on these assessments, but you can look at Table 2 in the paper and see the score ranges for the typical vs. disordered language groups. They also note that an MLUw of 4 or less can be a red flag for this group.

The major issue with this study, affecting our ability to generalize what it tells us, is that the sample size was really small—just 30 kids total. So, take these new results on board, but don’t override all that other smart stuff you know about assessing dual-language learners (see our links above for some refreshers if needed). And keep an eye out for more diagnostic studies down the road—you know we’ll point them out when they come!

 

Lazewnik, R., Creaghead, N. A., Smith, A. B., Prendeville, J.-A., Raisor-Becker, L., & Silbert, N. (2018). Identifiers of Language Impairment for Spanish-English Dual Language Learners. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. Advance online publication.  https://doi.org/10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0046