And more...

Baylis and Shriberg found that 14 of 17 children (82.4%) with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (aka DiGeorge syndrome and velocardiofacial syndrome) had comorbid motor speech disorders. Speech motor delay and childhood dysarthria were more common than CAS. These initial prevalence estimates add to a growing body of evidence that helps us better understand the profile of 22q syndrome.

Glover et al. found that young children (preschool through 3rd grade) had more negative attitudes toward stuttering than their parents. By 5th grade, those attitudes improved and were similar to attitudes of parents.

Hammarström et al. found that an intense treatment (4 sessions per week for 6 weeks) was effective for a 4 year old, Swedish-speaking child with a severe speech sound disorder. Treatment incorporated multiple approaches—integral stimulation, nonlinear phonology, and a core vocabulary approach. After therapy, the child produced more target words, word shapes, and consonants correctly.

Kraft et al. replicated an earlier study to find that effortful control (an aspect of temperament) was the most important factor predicting stuttering severity in children. They recommend addressing self-regulation as part of the holistic treatment of stuttering.

Lancaster and Camarata set out to explain the heterogeneity of language skills in kids with DLD. At this time, it’s looking like a spectrum model (think autism!) fits best, versus labeling kids by subtypes or chalking up the differences to unique, individual profiles; but lots more data is needed. For now, the evidence suggests we should assess and treat kids with DLD based on level of severity *and* individual needs—which is probably what you’re doing already. 

Lane et al. profiled the communication skills of children with Sotos Syndrome using a parent-report measure. They found that most of the children had a language impairment (with issues in both structure and pragmatics), with a relative strength in verbal vs. nonverbal communication and a weakness in using context. These children are likely to need support in peer relationships, too. 

Sutherland et al. found that a standardized language test (the CELF-4) can be reliably administered via telehealth to children with autism. The specific children they tested were between 9 and 12 years old and mostly mainstreamed.

 

Baylis, A. L., & Shriberg, L. D. (2018). Estimates of the prevalence of speech and motor speech disorders in youth with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. doi:10.1044/2018_AJSLP-18-0037

Glover, H. L., St Louis, K. O., & Weidner, M. E. (2018). Comparing stuttering attitudes of preschool through 5th grade children and their parents in a predominately rural Appalachian sample. Journal of Fluency Disorders. Advance online publication. doi:10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.11.001

Hammarström, I. L., Svensson, R., & Myrberg, K. (2018). A shift of treatment approach in speech language pathology services for children with speech sound disorders – a single case study of an intense intervention based on non-linear phonology and motor-learning principles. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics. Advance online publication. doi:10.1080/02699206.2018.1552990 

Kraft, S. J., Lowther, E., & Beilby, J. (2018). The Role of Effortful Control in Stuttering Severity in Children: Replication Study. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1044/2018_AJSLP-17-0097

Lancaster, H. S., & Camarata, S. (2018). Reconceptualizing developmental language disorder as a spectrum disorder: Issues and evidence. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders. Advance online publication. doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12433

Lane, C., Van Herwegen, J., & Freeth, M. (2018). Parent-Reported Communication Abilities of Children with Sotos Syndrome: Evidence from the Children’s Communication Checklist-2. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Advance online publication. doi:10.1007/s10803-018-3842-0

Sutherland, R., Trembath, D., Hodge, M. A., Rose, V., & Roberts, J. (2018). Telehealth and autism: Are telehealth language assessments reliable and feasible for children with autism? International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders. Advance online publication. doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12440