For October 2017, we reviewed 34 journals and identified 126 articles as potentially relevant to Pediatric and School-Based SLPs. We then narrowed it down to what's covered here. For more on how we do this, see here.

 

 

Narrative skills in verbal preschoolers with autism

This study looked at verbal preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders’ (ASDs) ability to comprehend and retell oral narratives. Children listened to a short story twice while looking at pictures on a computer. Between readings, they were asked...

 

Closing the gap in reading and writing skills of preschoolers with hearing loss

This study compared 19 preschoolers with hearing loss (who used amplification and spoken language) to 14 hearing preschoolers, with the goal of measuring “…change across a 6-month period in emergent literacy skills…”

 

Language in juvenile offenders: The importance of sampling expository discourse

We already know that a large proportion of juvenile offenders have Developmental Language Disorder (see article background for even more studies). What we don’t know is if there is something in particular about kids who get in trouble with the law, or if it has more to do with other overlapping risk factors, like a low-SES background, inconsistent school attendance, or nonverbal intelligence. This study addressed this question by...

 

LSA for diagnosing language disorder in Spanish–English bilingual children

This study looked at language samples from 40 Spanish-English bilingual children—20 with developmental language disorder and 20 with typical language. Samples were elicited in Spanish (L1) using wordless picture books. The children repeated a story read to them (retelling) and generated a story on their own (storytelling)...

 

Inferences in preschool and early elementary students—what matters?

This study measured the Inference Task (created by the authors) to determine: (1) whether it measured what it was intended to measure (i.e., listening comprehension), and (2) whether questions in the Inference Task designed to assess “local” vs. “global” inferences were really different...

 

Reviewing the validity and reliability of comprehensive language assessments: Or, which test is best?

Many factors influence which tests SLPs use when we evaluate language skills. What tests do I have? What will capture the skill gaps that I see in this client? What test will show progress after intervention? What test do I not hate giving? Just kidding… Evidence-based practice requires us to ask also: which tests have been shown empirically to be good tests...

 

GUEST POST: On the DYMOND (Dynamic Measure of Oral Narrative Discourse)

Have you been avoiding dynamic assessment because it is too complicated and time consuming? A new study by Petersen et al. (2016) outlines an efficient, accurate, and standardized way to identify language impairment in school-aged children using a narrative dynamic assessment...

 

And more...

Flipsen conducted a literature search to answer the question—what might be the outcome for a hearing-impaired child whose access to amplification is delayed (with no sign language in the interim)? This study was written as a guide for clinicians on searching the literature and making predictions for their own clients...

 

Perspective Pieces

On vocabulary, literacy, AAC, autism...

 

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