For July 2017, we reviewed 34 journals and identified 100 articles as potentially relevant to Pediatric and School-Based SLPs. We then narrowed it down to what's covered here. For more on how we do this, see here.

 

Dialect Awareness for School-Age Children

Children who enter school speaking a non-mainstream dialect must quickly learn to dialect shift (a.k.a “code-switch”). Similar to bilingual children, they have two sets of syntactic, semantic, morphologic, and phonological rules, to be applied in different settings and with different...

 

Error patterns of monolingual Spanish speakers with language disorder

Historically, studies of language disorder and grammatical error patterns have been primarily done on English-speaking children. For Spanish-speaking children, most recent studies have been mostly on bilingual Spanish–English speakers, who may have different error patterns than monolingual...

 

Job interview skills for teens with language disorder

Young adults with language disorders are expected to obtain and keep jobs, even though their disability may be a hindrance. This is perhaps most true in the interview process, when first impressions are key— “… the ability to communicate effectively during the interview process is paramount...

 

Communicating with families from a strengths-based perspective

Many of us have been taught to write our evaluation and progress reports from a strengths-based perspective. The point of using strengths-based report writing, though isn’t just because it’s respectful or kind to the child and family (though that’s certainly enough!), but also because research has shown it improves the therapy process...

 

Personal narrative intervention for older children with Down syndrome

Language disorder and cognitive weaknesses are common in children with Down Syndrome (DS). Yet, research on language intervention for older children with Down syndrome is lacking, leaving little guidance for the practicing SLP. This feasibility study provides us with some guidance...

 

Listening fatigue in typically-developing children

...demonstrate that typically-developing school-aged children exhibit significant fatigue after listening to speech in noise over a period of 3 hours, even with 5–15-minute breaks. The listening conditions in this experiment were comparable to what children experience daily in the classroom...

 

Using a child’s AAC device to instruct them on AAC

“Augmented input” is when the clinician or communication partner uses the child’s AAC system to communicate with the child (aka: aided language stimulation, aided language modeling, aided AAC modeling… not perfect synonyms, but all meaning nearly the same thing). So, what do we know about the impact of augmented input? This article reviews data...

 

AAC assessment and intervention for preschoolers with severe speech impairment

This review covers two research papers in one, from the same research group and measuring the same students, the first paper on dynamic assessment of AAC users, and the second paper on intervention for AAC users. In both studies, the participants were 3–4-year-old children with receptive language within normal limits, but severe speech impairment (< 50% intelligible). The children were provided an iPad with Proloquo2Go to use for AAC...

 

Perspective Pieces

On language intervention, AAC, and service provision for people with disabilities...

 

And more…

On cerebral palsy, Autism, reading...

 

 

 

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