Understanding Mexican culture to inform clinical practice

7.png

Understanding the culture of the clients we serve is always crucial to implementing effective evidence-based practice. This article is a great one for learning about the impact of Mexican culture on language and learning.

This study of 35 Mexican mothers of toddlers is one of the most well-done and dense (in a good way) descriptions of the associations between culture, language, and learning we’ve seen in a while. There is a lot in here; so, honestly, if you have a large proportion of Mexican children on your caseload, this study warrants a full read!

But, of course, we’ll give you a couple big take-aways, to give you something to consider right away! Two primary ones from this article were:

  1. Consider the developmental relevance of activities other than play. When coaching a parent on how to stimulate language naturally, you must know what activities that adult participates in most with the child. For Mexican mothers, this is often mealtime and caregiving routines, and less often things like pretend play.

  2. Consider communication partners other than the mother. Mexican families tend to value the roles of everyone in the family—older siblings, dad, extended family members— in teaching and raising the child. Perhaps most notable is the role of older siblings, who not only play a lot with the younger siblings but also teach them how to behave and participate productively in the family. Basically, if you’re only looking at coaching mom, you’re likely not looking broadly enough, and need to consider the diverse and integral roles of all family members.

Cycyk, L.M., & Hammer, C. (2019). Beliefs, values, and practices of Mexican immigrant families towards language and learning in toddlerhood: Setting the foundation for early childhood education. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. doi:10.1016/j.ecresq.2018.09.009