And more...

Benítez-Barrera et al. found that when caregivers of young children with hearing loss used a remote microphone system (RMS) at home, their children were able to potentially access about 12% more child-directed speech (CDS). The RMS allowed children to access CDS that they’d otherwise miss because their caregivers were physically too far away. With an RMS running about $200 a unit, we thought it was worth bringing to your attention the potential benefit of parents using this technology in the home setting.

In a meta-analysis, Edmunds et al. found that how responsive parents of children with ASD were to their child’s communication was directly related to their child’s communication skills. They also looked at studies on responsiveness interventions, but found the evidence to be inconclusive. According to their analysis, more research is needed to conclude whether or not teaching parent responsiveness alone is enough to improve child outcomes—and if so, which ones. 

Hustad et al.  looked at development of speech intelligibility in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and the results can be used to guide decisions that we make in terms of timing of intervention. Specifically, the findings suggest that a child with CP is a good candidate for speech therapy if they do not:

  • demonstrate at least 25% intelligibility for single words by 29 months

  • demonstrate at least 50% intelligibility by 40 months

  • demonstrate at least 75% intelligibility by 58 months

And, by the age of 40 months, the authors suggest that therapy may also need to include some type of AAC system. The authors state, "Intelligibility focused therapy may still be beneficial, but as children enter a reduction in rate of growth after 5 years, progress may be slower with regard to change in speech." 

Justice et al.’s  study of language development in children from very low-income households, shows significantly lower receptive language skills in these children, much of which was found to be explained by dysregulated parent–child interactions, which is associated with parent distress.

Research gets us closer and closer to being able to really predict autism as early as possible. This study of 12-month-olds by Kadlaskar et al. found that those who end up with an autism diagnosis respond differently to caregiver touch—they’re more likely to a) not attend to the touch as a communicative act, and/or b) turn away from touch; also, their response predicts later autism severity.

We’ve discussed the topic of early regression in autism recently here, and Ozonoff and Iosif’s recent review of the research further confirms that language regression in the first year occurs for the majority of children with autism. Findings from their meta-analysis also suggest that standardized, normed checklists and questionnaires (like the Communication and Social Behavior Scales) completed by parents can be an effective way to identify lack of language development and loss of skills. 


Benítez-Barrera, C.R., Thompson, E.C., Angley, G.P., Woynaroski, T., & Tharpe, A.M. (2019). Remote microphone system use at home: Impact on child-directed speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. doi: 10.1044/2019_JSLHR-H-18-0325

Edmunds, S.R., Kover, S.T., Stone, W. (2019). The relation between parent verbal responsiveness and child communication in young children with or at risk for autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review and meta‐analysis. Autism Research. doi: 10.1002/aur.2100

Hustad, K., Sakash, A., Natzke, P., Broman, A., & Rathouz, P. (2019). Longitudinal growth in single word intelligibility among children with cerebral palsy from 24 to 96 months of age: Predicting later outcomes from early speech production. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. doi: 10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-18-0319

Justice, L.M., Jiang, H., Purtell, K.M., Schmeer, K., Boone, K., Bates, R., Salsberry, P.J. (2019). Conditions of Poverty, Parent-Child Interactions, and Toddlers' Early Language Skills in Low- Income Families. Maternal and Child Health Journal. doi: 10.1007/s10995-018-02726-9.

Kadlaskar G., Seidl A., Tager-Flusberg H., Nelson C.A., Keehn B. (2019). Atypical Response to Caregiver Touch in Infants at High Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. doi: 10.1007/s10803-019-04021-0 

Ozonoff, S. & Iosif, A. (2019). Changing conceptualization of regression: What prospective studies reveal about the onset of autism spectrum disorder. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.03.012