Let’s hear it for the verbs! Parents’ early verb use predicts children with ASD’s later verb vocabulary

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Verbs are important for early language development; they are the building blocks for early sentences and help kids tell us about the things that are happening around them. But as we know, many of our children with ASD struggle to learn and use them flexibly. We know from the literature that for typically developing children, parents’ verb use can predict their later verb vocabulary. These researchers wanted to know if the same was true for children with ASD.

To do this, they measured the verbs that parents of children with ASD used during “follow-in utterances.” Follow-in utterances are comments that parents make during moments when they and their child are both focused on the same thing. So if a child knocked down a tower of blocks and looked up at his mom, her saying, “The tower crashed!” would be a follow-in utterance. The researchers looked at three aspects of parent verb use during follow-in utterances:

  1. The quantity of verb input, i.e., how often parents said verbs

  2. The diversity of verb input, i.e. how many different verbs parents said

  3. The grammatical informativeness of verb input, i.e. how much rich morphological information surrounded the verb. For example, “We’re jumping” would be more grammatically informative than “jump.” (See the article’s appendix for additional definitions and examples.)

They found that together, these three aspects of parent verb use during follow-in utterances predicted children with ASD’s later verb vocabulary. Because this is a correlational study (and doesn’t tell us what causes what), we’ll need further research to tell us if teaching parents to increase their quantity and quality of verb use will improve their children’s verb vocabulary. That being said, here are some ways authors describe that this line of research may impact what we teach parents:

  • We could teach parents to expand what their child says by adding a verb. For example, if the child says, “baby,” we could teach the parent to respond with, “the baby is sleeping,” rather than adding on to the noun phrase (e.g. “little baby”).

  • We could encourage parents to use diverse verbs during follow-in utterances, rather than over-relying on a small number of verbs and verb forms (such as “I want _____,” or “I need ______”).

  • We could teach parents to use grammatical language, rather than telegraphic. Because including grammatical morphemes seems to support children’s learning of verbs, we could teach parents to model fully grammatical language. For more research about using grammatical vs telegraphic language, see our previous review here.

 

Crandall, M.C., McDaniel, J., Watson, L.R., Yoder, P.J. (2019). The relation between early parent verb input and later expressive verb vocabulary in children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. doi:10.1044/2019_JSLHR-L-18-0081.