And more...

  • Do you find the coaching model challenging? You’re not alone! Sometimes it can feel like scientists are telling us what to do without considering how challenging it is to implement their interventions in the real world. That’s why articles like this one are so exciting for practicing SLPs. These researchers interviewed early intervention SLPs about their experiences attempting to implement the coaching model. They gleaned insight from SLPs about their barriers, benefits, and experiences, and perspective. The bottom line? SLPs see the value in the coaching model, but need more and better training and ongoing support in order to be confident and competent in using it.

  •  Did you know that onomatopoeia (words that represent sounds, like “buzz”) are especially common in infant’s speech? Liang discovered that onomatopoeia are phonologically easier to recall, plan, and produce, which explains why infants acquire them at such a young age. The easiest forms for infants to produce are CV words like “moo”, and words with consonant harmony like “pop.”

  • When it comes to diagnosing autism, we all have two goals—to do it as early as possible, and to do it as quickly as possible, because both factors lead to the child receiving early intervention services sooner, and this is key. Mayes’ study showed that using the condensed version of a commercially available interview and checklist—the Short Form of the Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder—was just as effective at identifying toddlers and preschoolers with ASD as the full Checklist. I don’t know about you, but the idea of being able to reliably and accurately identify young children with ASD using 6 instead of 30 items is pretty encouraging news!

  • Reisinger et al. examined data on the vocalizations of 11 young boys with a diagnosis of Fragile X and their caregivers compared to peers matched by chronological age and developmental age.  They found that caregivers of children with Fragile X vocalized less often and took fewer conversational turns than caregivers of typically developing children, possibly contributing to a cycle of poor language development and a less than ideal language environment.

  • As EI providers, we’re always looking for new ways to support children with ASD through collaboration and coaching. Shire and colleagues’ recent study looked at training teaching assistants (TAs) to provide the play-based intervention, JASPER—Joint Attention, Symbolic Play, Engagement, and Regulation—to toddlers with ASD in an early intervention classroom. Through extensive coaching and support from a supervisor during the first year and assistance from group leaders during the second year, the TAs were able to effectively implement the JASPER program. And, the children showed the same level of improvement in joint attention during the first and second year of the study. But, play skills only significantly improved during year one, when the TAs were receiving the highest level of support. These results suggest that training TAs and other support staff to provide language intervention with children with ASD can be effective, but if we want long lasting effects, we may need to provide a high level of consistent support.

  

Douglas, S., Meadan, H., Kammes, R. (2019). Early interventionists’ caregiver coaching: A mixed methods approach exploring experiences and practices. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education. doi:10.1177/0271121419829899.

Liang, C.E. (2019). Phonological motivation for the acquisition of onomatopoeia: An analysis of early words. Language and Learning Development. doi:10.1177%2F0142723714550110.

Mayes, S. D. (2019). Assessing toddlers and preschool children using the checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder. Infants & Young Children. doi:10.1097/IYC.0000000000000136.

Shire, S. Y., Shih, W., Ya-Chih, C., Bracaglis, S., Kodjoe, M., & Kasari, C. (2019). Sustained community implementation of JASPER intervention with toddlers with Autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. doi: 10.1007/s10803-018-03875-0.

Reisinger, D. L., Shaffer, R. C., Pedapati, E. V., Dominick, K. C., & Erickson, C. A. (2019). A pilot quantitative evaluation of early life language development in Fragile X syndrome. Brain Sciences. doi:10.3390/brainsci9020027