And more

  • Remember the Index of Productive Syntax (IPSyn) from grad school? Altenberg et al. modified the instructions to make them a little clearer and reminded us that IPSyn is great for describing toddlers’ and preschoolers’ grammatical development. See their updated instructions in the article Appendix and consider giving IPSyn another shot. (NOTE: If you’ve never heard of this thing before, it’s a way to measure syntax production in young children.)

 

  • It seems that we’re always looking for a quicker, easier way to quantify our young clients’ language skills and progress in therapy. This study looked at whether the automated language analysis system, LENA (Language Environment Analysis), a device that’s worn around the child’s neck, could provide a reliable measure of rate of vocalizations during short recording sessions. Results suggested that human transcribers were able to capture more reliable rates of child vocalizations when the recording was 25 minutes or less. So, although the LENA seems to be a useful tool for longer recordings, findings from this study suggest that when transcribing and analyzing short language samples, it’s best to stick to doing it the old-fashioned way—by hand.

 

  • Sharabi et al. found that mothers of children with ASD tend to be more involved in their child’s care, especially when they felt they had informal support from family and friends. Fathers with higher education levels tended to be more involved with their child’s care, especially single fathers.

 

Altenberg, E. P., Roberts, J. A., & Scarborough, H. S. (2018). Young children's structure production: A revision of the Index of Productive Syntax. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0092.

Bredin-Oja, H., Fleming, K., & Warren, S. (2018). Clinician vs. machine: Estimating vocalization rates in young children with developmental disorders. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 27, 1066–1072.

Sharabi, A., & Marom-Golan, D. (2018). Social support, education level, and parent’s involvement: A comparison between mothers and fathers of children with autism spectrum disorder. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/0271121418762511